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09.14.23 | Uncategorized

The Secrets of Longevity Diets

Much like how joyspotting brings small bursts of happiness into our lives, longevity diets offer a passport to a healthier future. They’re not the latest diet fad but a treasure trove from cultures celebrated for their centenarians. These diets aren’t about restriction, but celebrating foods that have nourished generations.

The Mediterranean region, with its lush olive groves and sparkling blue waters, gives us a diet rich in healthy fats, fresh produce, and fish. Then there are the Blue Zones, regions scattered across the globe, each boasting their unique recipe for longevity. Okinawa offers sweet potatoes, while Loma Linda champions plant-based delights. As varied as they are, each region offers a culinary experience that keeps its inhabitants thriving.

Peel back the layers of these diets, and you’ll find common heroes: vibrant vegetables, whole grains, and natural ingredients, bursting with antioxidants. These foods don’t just fill our stomachs; they fortify our cells, combat oxidative stress, and can even put chronic ailments at bay. It’s like finding those hidden joys in our surroundings; these foods are tiny marvels waiting to be celebrated.

Of course, food is just one slice of the pie. The longest-living people don’t just eat well; they move, cherish community, and embrace positivity. It’s a holistic dance of diet, activity, and mental well-being. Just like the vibrant energy a pet brings into a home, longevity diets infuse life with a zest that extends well beyond our plates.

As you savor your next meal, think of it as an invitation to a life rich in both years and experiences. Whether you’re trying out Mediterranean recipes or simply adding more whole foods, remember: every bite is a step towards a future bursting with health and vitality.

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07.28.22 | Sage Advice

How to Combat Senioritis As An Adult

It’s not just teenagers who can feel senioritis adults can too. We’ve all experienced it at some point; laziness, disinterest, having no motivation, not caring about the outcomes of our life. But just because these symptoms of checking out are universally experienced doesn’t make them okay to ignore. Today, we’re investigating adult senioritis, how checking out can affect your wellbeing and tools you can use to combat it:

What Senioritis Looks Like As An Adult

You might know senioritis as the affliction many seniors in high school experience as they enter their final year when their motivation declines and their drive to succeed diminishes. Though this phenomenon isn’t just found in young adults, anyone can experience senioritis. 

Typically, senioritis begins when there is a sign of a major transformation occurring in life, like graduating high school or even starting a new job. It begins with a fear of the future and feeling like you may not have control over a situation. As we age, many of the small tasks we enjoy earlier in life become tiresome and lose value to us, which can lead to checking out. 

However, it’s important to remember that checking out looks different to every person. The key is to recognize the signs and signals once you see them and begin taking action to snap out of the senioritis. 

How You Can Combat It

After acknowledging that you may be checking out, don’t start by setting unattainable goals for yourself – start small. Give yourself a to-do list of a handful of goals to reach every day, whether that’s going to the grocery store to run errands or making sure you respond to all of your emails. 

Once you’ve given yourself a list of small goals to aim for, the next step is to pair an incentive to it! Use motivations that connect back to why you might be checking out in the first place; if you’re starting a job, go shopping for new work clothes. Whatever your incentive is, use that to help drive you to complete your goals. 

As you tackle senioritis and become an active participant in your life again, remember to take it one step at a time. It might not always feel like you’ll be able to step out of it, but you will. 

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